Write Better Copy with PASSION Points

How to get better results with your marketing messages

If you can write you can talk. This is often easier said than done. For some writing is not fun. In fact, some of the most well-spoken people I know have a block around writing, especially writing marketing copy.

My goal is to remove those blocks for you so you can write better copy, take back your marketing power by claiming your voice (in writing), and learn techniques to make the entire process less painful and more profitable.

I firmly believe that marketing is all about creating a strong relationship with your prime prospects and empowering them with information that supports hiring YOU or investing in your products and services.

Here’s where it gets a little tricky. Many view marketing as a necessary evil and writing marketing copy gets a bad rap because of this association. There are some valid reasons that people resist marketing. One in particular is that some marketers and copywriters use less than desirable techniques (like the problem, agitate and solve approach) that focus on poking at pain points to agitate angst and tap into painful emotional triggers to elicit a response. This approach often turns people off and, in fact, it can perpetuate buyer’s remorse.

After all, if we’re building relationships, shouldn’t we do that based on a solid foundation of trust not deceit or manipulation? I think so.

Here are some things to consider so you can break past common blocks and eliminate the use of manipulation in marketing.

  • It’s important to realize that marketing and writing copy are relationship building tools (this powerful shift makes BIG impact)
  • It’s important to remember that YOU are the authority on your topic (write as if you are talking to one person and craft your message in way that highlights your brand personality)
  • It’s important to know your ideal client (you cannot be all things to everyone even if you can do a lot of things – so be clear about who you serve and speak to them)
  • It’s important to have a plan and strategy for every revenue stream (that means you’ll need to write marketing copy for each product and service you offer)
  • It’s important to acknowledge the challenge of your prime prospects, meet them where they are with empathy and understanding to focus on PASSION points and paint a picture of possibility (instead of poking at pain points and listing lack)
  • It’s important to offer your solution in a way that makes sense (include case studies, results and key information that further positions you as the natural choice. Hint: telling people what you do doesn’t cut it. You must tell them how what you do will make their life better.)
  • It’s important to extend an invitation (remember to continue the conversation and ASK them to take the next step i.e. schedule an appointment, sign up for a newsletter, call, come into your location or fill out an application)

By keeping it real, applying my simple “Challenge. Solution. Invitation.™” framework, and learning some advanced copywriting techniques you can write better copy with a focus on PASSION points. This approach builds relationships and trust while positioning you as the authority in your industry. It also helps you stand out in a sea of manipulative, hard sell, marketing messages that simply aren’t working like they once did.

For more tips claim your complimentary Copywriting Action Plan at www.writeoncreative.com  or learn advanced copywriting techniques via the self -study course Create Copy to Connect and Convert With PASSION Points.

 

Before Editing, Gain Some Perspective

Editing our own writing, whether it’s a book chapter, article or blog post, requires us to look at our own work with fresh eyes.

We need to leave the creative shoes of the writer behind and step into the critical, precise shoes of the editor. This is not an easy transition and often requires a great deal of practice for the so called “shoe to fit.”

Both of the photographs here are of the same beautiful bowl — the beautiful bowl of creation. In the first, zoomed-in view, it’s too close to appreciate any of the beauty. The second offers some much needed distance and perspective to take it all in.

And so it is with our writing and editing.

We write of what we know, what we’ve done, what we like writing about. Topics close to our hearts and events from the mental photo albums of our minds. We hope that the way we think of something can be conveyed onto paper as we write, but, do we ever really know? What happens as our stories travel from memory and brain wave to muscle to hand to pen or keyboard? We worry that something is lost and yet, we are too close to read it critically.

But we have a wonderful ability to change all that.

We can change our perspective.

Pull back to see more clearly...

Step back to see more clearly…

We can put distance between our writing and our reading so that we can edit our own work.

When we review our own writing with a plan to edit it, too, we remain the writer, nonetheless. We cannot fully step away from that role. And so, we need some strategies to put distance between writer and editor; to broaden perspective and step back from what we write so that we can edit it:

  1. Put time and space between writing and editing. Allow as much time as possible between when you write and when you go back to edit your work. Whenever possible, overnight is helpful but do what you can, even if it is only a few hours. Some recommend letting your finished book draft sit a full month before you pick it back up. The time away from the content helps you let go of what you intended enough so that you can see it with fresh eyes when editing. It’s even suggested that you edit in a different place than the one in which you wrote.
  2. Print it out. If you created your writing digitally, print out a hard copy. Whether or not you print, change the font in style or size to alter the view enough to get your brain to consider it as something new.
  3. Read it aloud. By reading out loud, you’re now using another sense to evaluate your writing. It is often by hearing that you pick up on a section that seems too awkward or a word that is used too often. It’s a great way to examine the flow of your piece and even to gauge its length. It allows you to check for conversational writing…the kind of writing that works best!
  4. Read it as if someone else. Put yourself in someone else’s shoes and read it all the way through, as if you are that person that is not you reading material that you do not know. Take nothing for granted, like the meaning of a word or the meaning in the gaps between the words. If something is not straightforward, fix it! Replace jargon with clarity and add information when needed to explain things thoroughly and more clearly to an outsider. Then read it through again for another round!
  5. Ask someone else to read it. This can be someone in your family, young or old. It’s even better when it can be someone unfamiliar with the content. Ask them to be critical and comfortable sharing what they think.

When you’ve given yourself the gift of a new perspective, you give your writing a better chance of meeting someone else across the page. You connect with your readers as your words invite them to see things from your perspective!

How do you change your perspective when editing your writing? Please share in the comments.

Deb Coman is a Communication Strategist, Speaker, Writer and Editor helping entrepreneurs, coaches, authors and energy healers get a more polished, professional message out into the world so they Get Clear, Get Noticed and Get Paid! Using a strategy based on content- and relationship-marketing, Deb teaches how to communicate through writing and live streaming to engage and convert targeted audiences to clients, collaborators and referral sources...all while feeling comfortable, confident and having some fun online!

Seven Best Practices of Editing Your Own Work

Create Great HeadlinesNothing kills credibility faster than mistakes in your book.

Before you submit your work to an editor, there are a number of strategies you can use to save time and money.

1. Walk Away From Your Work

Try and give yourself at least a week between writing and editing your manuscript. Something magical happens during this break; it allows you to detach from the work, giving you more clarity and greater perspective. Build this extra time in from the beginning if possible so that you can let it sit before you edit. You’ll be amazed at the objectivity you gain when you stop focusing so intently on the content.

2. Print Out Your Manuscript

Often it’s useful to take a look at your work in a published form (or as close to it as you can get). You may notice problems that didn’t stand out before.

[info]Sign up for Karen’s webinar with Social Buzz U -and learn the absolute “musts” for editing your own book.[/info]  Continue reading

Create a Valuable Free Offer that Turns Leads Into Clients

A valuable free offer is the first step in building a relationship with your audience – especially on your website. 

giftsIf you don’t have an offer on your website there is no point in driving traffic to it in the first place.  But your offer has to be good.  The days of people trading their email address for a newsletter are long gone.  To compete with all the marketing noise and stand out from the crowd, your offer needs to be really compelling.  Build trust by offering up a valuable free offer that your audience wants.  Here are 3 steps to creating a free offer that will have leads pouring in:

Figure out what the audience’s pain points are.

The easiest way to do this is by listening to your existing clients. Sometimes the reason they hired you in the first place is to treat a symptom, not the root cause of the problem. I found out that many of my clients wanted to improve their time management, even though they hired me to help with goal setting and business planning.  Because time management is such a huge topic, I was able to create a free offer around time management for entrepreneurs that visitors could request and download from my website.  I leveraged this idea for my speaking gigs and created a 30-minute CD that I give out in exchange for a business card or email.  Almost everyone takes the CD and I walk away with new leads.

Focus on your area of expertise.

What do you have the answers for? It doesn’t have to be for the exact thing you’re selling, it can be for something complimentary. My free offer used to be time management tools for entrepreneurs.  I wasn’t selling time management coaching exclusively but it was a very important piece of the success puzzle for my clients who are juggling multiple responsibilities. Time management is just one piece but it’s a critical piece that influences the other pieces.  Do make sure your offer fits into your overall strategy and that you can create upsells from it.  I sell a time management workbook and have a membership site that is focused on time management so it made sense.

Create a valuable give-away – don’t be afraid to provide content.

You are an expert and there is no way that you can possibly give everything away in one article or eBook or CD. You are creating a first impression. If you are generous with the free stuff then people will remember you as being someone with valuable info.  They will keep coming back for more and you’ve proven that you will provide great value if they hire you. Vice versa if you’re stingy. 

Remember, it takes at least 7 touches to convert a prospect to a client.  But they have to want to see your stuff, to open your emails, to hear what you have to say in order for those 7 touches to be effective.  So go ahead and give your best stuff away.  If you do this well, you’ll be on your way to building a list of pre-qualified prospects, some of whom will turn into paying clients.

Learn more with Liz in her FREE Social Buzz U Webinar on July 25, 2013!

Liz is the owner of The Coach & Mentor Group. She loves helping solo entrepreneurs develop profitable business models! She calls herself a business strategist because when she listen to clients she can visualize their big picture and help them break it down into step by step, manageable pieces. Her tag line says it all: "My Goal Is To Help You Reach Yours!"

Tips for Creating Magnetic Headlines

Extra! Extra! We can’t stress this enough!

Whether you’re writing a blog post, an article, a display ad, a landing page, or any marketing copy for that matter, the headline is one of the most important factors in marketing, and also the factor most business overlook.

Too many times, headlines are tacked on as an afterthought—something to stick on top after we’ve written the piece—when in fact, it should be the part we labor on the hardest, because it accomplishes the most important task… capturing your reader’s attention long enough to compel him to read further.  Continue reading

An experienced copywriter, Apryl specializes in web copy and content strategies and was personally trained in white paper writing by Michael Stelzner as his apprentice. She shares her marketing expertise through seminars, workshops and her blog. Apryl is also a Certified Social Media Marketing Strategist, helping businesses with direct coaching, packages for development of social platforms, content strategies and marketing plans that bridge the gap between traditional and social media marketing.